August 24, 2019, 09:05:50 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: Smiths Machine good for anything?  (Read 3800 times)
knightrider
****
Posts: 399


« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2013, 02:03:07 AM »

My smith machine uses are...

1 hang the TRX and bands on/over..
2 put fat gripz on for pull ups and other exercises such as inverted rows.. basically nothing that requires the bar to travel
3 I enjoy seated calf raises on them with my feet on a step up box

Seated calf raises, yes! I tried them once was murder on my thighs I wreckon they are good though if a comfort pad was wrapped round the bar if in a gym with no seated calf raises machine (like my gym)

I put one of those pansy pads around the bar, its one of only thing they good for plus grip training. If not I use a jumper or fold up a towel Tongue
Logged
stretchandburn
****
Posts: 475

markadams81@hotmail.com
Email
« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2013, 11:16:49 PM »

I love my bar pad I use it on squat rack, I hate the way the bar digs in my neck. I used to use my jumper but if its uneven I find it a pain in the arse. So pansy pad all the way for me.

On the subject of smiths machine I think it has its place but it can be restrictive and never as good as free weight or Olympic bar in my opinion.

However I seem to remember at body power a few years ago they had like a hybrid version of smiths machine that not only moved up and down but back and forward. But since then I've never seen it again?
Logged
Monbeef
*****
Posts: 7994


Author of The Tower Grave - available on Amazon!


Email
« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2013, 06:13:33 AM »

A few points then:

The Smith machine that moved forwards and backwards is actually called the 'Jones Machine'! If you don't believe me, google it. I remember the adverts in FLEX magazine.

Next, yes reverse grip benches are great. I normally use DBs and hadn't considered a Smith. I will now. Allegedly they activate the upper chest around 30% more than normal benches whereas inclines only add 10%.

And then Toby, you really must master the dbs getting them into place. Its so easy once you get the technique. I can whip 50's up to incline and even to shoulder press without too much trouble and trust me I can't just curl them up there. With practice it'll be easy and won't tax you before your set.

Stretch, again, practice without the pad, I swear when you get it right you won't feel the bar on your traps at all. Find the spot it nestles into. For me its across my mid traps between my upper trap bulge and my rear delts which is rests on. And yoy have to really tense your traps up. Unnecessary you may say, but you know, in the interests of not being girly... Smiley

The smith I have access to is very heavy. Got to be well over 20kg on the bar as standard.
Logged
Glen Danbury
*****
Posts: 4279


fuelled by EQ nutrition


WWW Email
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2013, 09:42:52 AM »

IMO if it it digs into your neck the bars too high - even for a high bar squat! when you squat with a bar in a medium position and have the bar supported through retraction of the scapula there is a fair deghree of meat supporting it and virtually no pain

I just dont like smith machines as inj one way or another they will forceyou to comprimise one joint or another due to the fixed pathway but I am sure it has some uses - if I had a gym I would never buy one
Logged
Mr Hypertrophy
*****
Posts: 1148


« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2013, 02:39:55 PM »

About 3 years ago I was using the smith to do Chest Incline and ended up tearing a muscle in my shoulder, never used one since.
Logged
stretchandburn
****
Posts: 475

markadams81@hotmail.com
Email
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2013, 10:18:29 PM »

Jones machine hey I never knew that. I wonder why it never took off then.? Or maybes I've just not seen it locally. Has anyone else seen one in a gym and used it?

I'll take your comments on the squats then and try again with my positioning of the bar. I just seem to always feel it digs into the bottom of my neck. Maybes this is bad form then? Will see.
Logged
Smithey
*****
Posts: 1740


"I get knocked down but I get up again".


Email
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2013, 11:01:16 PM »

Whenever I go to Aberystwyth every summer, I train at the University gym which has such a machine. They are useful for bent over rows and squats. As mentioned in a previous post, Rich Gozdecki can be seen using one training his back in Future gym Coventry on YouTube.
Logged
stretchandburn
****
Posts: 475

markadams81@hotmail.com
Email
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2013, 12:02:26 AM »

I'll have a look dude nice one  Smiley
Logged
vodkafan
*****
Posts: 526


« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2013, 09:32:59 PM »

I don't agree Smith Machine is useless.   I had a slipped disc and was very weak  but the Smith Machine enabled me to gradually build up my squats in complete safety (I had to train on my own) to the point where I could squat almost double my bodyweight.
There is another reason I like it that is more complicated to explain.  I have a slight asymmetry in my body in that my left leg is about 1/2 inch longer than my right.  What this does in practice is that it throws my hips out. When doing a  free squat with a barbell , when I had any significant weight on the bar my hips would twist to try and compensate, and different muscles on each leg would get the benefit. It was very weird, and it took me years to figure this out.  It was also kinda dangerous to have a heavyish weight swinging about  horizontally when I am trying to go up and down .
 The Smith Machine  helps alleviate this,  my hips cannot twist and  forces the same muscular development on both sides.
That other thing that Rich Mc is talking about, placing his feet further forward , is another useful technique.  Some say it makes the lift more like a sort of leg press and not a true squat. But if something works for somebody  I think it's OK.
Logged
Damon Eaton
*****
Posts: 1368


Damon "The Truth" Eaton. Free Agent.


Email
« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2013, 09:28:39 PM »


Next, yes reverse grip benches are great. I normally use DBs and hadn't considered a Smith. I will now. Allegedly they activate the upper chest around 30% more than normal benches whereas inclines only add 10%.


I remember reading this before which has given me a new school of though regarding the smiths. Incline Reverse Grip Bench Press. 30% + 10% = 40% more upper pec recruitment in theory. I may throw some of these in at the end of a chest session in high volume sets could be worth a blast.
Logged
Monbeef
*****
Posts: 7994


Author of The Tower Grave - available on Amazon!


Email
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2013, 06:46:02 AM »

I tried incline reverse grip and it felt almost exclusively anterior deltoid specific. I find flat is the only way for reverse grips. You may find it better though, give it a whirl.

I find the only way I can really hit my upper chest is flat reverse grip bench, leaning flye/raises as I name them, and very high incline slow flye/presses (as opposed to flyers or presses individually. It works as a hybrid to me to hit pecs not delts at very steep angles such as 60 degrees.
Logged
Nic
*****
Posts: 3604


Work hard, be nice.


WWW
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2013, 08:38:13 AM »

However I seem to remember at body power a few years ago they had like a hybrid version of smiths machine that not only moved up and down but back and forward. But since then I've never seen it again?

Jones machine? We have one at my gym.
Logged
monkeybiker
*
Posts: 43


« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2013, 11:28:24 AM »

From my point of view if you access to a power rack then a smith machine is pretty pointless. If the gym didn't have a rack then I would use it but I would prefer a barbell and power rack.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Natural Muscle Forum: Discussion on UK natural bodybuilding, weight training, strongman, powerlifting, weight loss, nutrition and supplements
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!