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Author Topic: Pensive Strength Preaching - Patience  (Read 3530 times)
Monbeef
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« on: September 26, 2016, 02:50:51 PM »

Fully structured strength programs really do take some patience. At the end they take the will to make those new limit reps set after set, session after session leading up to that almost dead moment when a deload is at its best.

But at the beginning? When you want to push yourself in your usual manner, when you want to feel the strain of massive weights and when you want to see new PB's and exciting numbers hit the board? It's then that you have to be patient and bored and patient once more.

I know that soon the weights will be heavy and soon I will be able to go in the gym all fired up and walk out over the moon with my performance.

I know that banging my head against a brick wall for 12 weeks won't break it down and that rather slowly building a bigger hammer while chipping away at the bottom ready to smash the more vulnerable top with a bigger force will do.

And I know that every rep I do now, whether they push me to where I want to cry or not, is still stimulating growth and development in my muscles, connective tissue and nervous system. Every time I walk in the gym and hit those pre-planned numbers no matter how achievable, I am telling my body to respond to handle them.

When I get to my current PB's, through weeks of structured development I will power through them as I will be stronger by then.

When I get to my current PB's I will still be fresh. I will be stronger than I was before I will not yet be fatigued.

When I surpass my PB's and it gets exciting every time I walk into the gym with adrenaline through fear of not making the numbers, it's then that the building blocks will come into their own and I will be a bigger, stronger athlete.

So now, every rep I do will be focused to optimum form, optimum contraction and optimum use of power, tempo and control. Every rest period I take will be timed and will be short while the weights are lower. Every meal I eat will be designed to help those reps go to good use.

Strength programs. They take calculation, they take guts, they take resilience, they take effort and they take patience. But when they're done, the result is worth every second.
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egg-custard
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« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2016, 12:58:44 PM »

great post... very apt and inspirational

progress  can means a few different things to people...me its trying to achieve new goals..........im 54 now so I wont be a massive dude..but as long as im a fit dude and look ok im happy.....
running is my use for fitness other have other aims

and with inspirational post it does help us all to push just a bit harder when needed to achieve


nice one    eggy..............or andy
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K_Dogs
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2016, 10:54:01 AM »

During the "building back up" phase i'm trying to focus on the overall 1RM calculation regardless of actual weight on the bar. A 10 rep set can also equal a new PB (when calculated) however I don't think that all higher rep sets are treated with enough attention.
 
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SuperplexSteve
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« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2016, 02:52:58 PM »

This post is very good timing for me.  I've just returned to the gym and taking things slowly as I try to re-build.  I'm currently running a pull, push, leg program with a 5x5 for each of my main compound lifts.

It is so tempting to go past 5 reps, but I know I need to be patient.  I sometimes convince myself that the first rep didn't count but I need to just trust the program.
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