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Author Topic: how did you...and maybe i could try  (Read 7975 times)
egg-custard
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« on: December 02, 2016, 12:20:59 PM »

how did you get into competing and why..?

inspired by recent posts and journals I have been thinking..i will would like to try at a competition

I think I could with lots more work have the confidence to try..


what do you get out of competing.. ? it must be such a buzz  to put your hard work on show wether its body showing or strength

akin to crossing the line in a marathon...

eggy


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Badger
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2016, 10:32:08 PM »

I grew up loving watching action films with Van Damme, Arnie, Stallone and Bruce Lee so always wanted to have that look. Then when in my teens I found a copy of Arnold's Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding in the loft and that did it for me.

When I was 24/25 I was sat on my sofa reading a copy of the Beef and read an article on the BNBF central I think it was and thought "maybe you don't have to look like Ronnie Coleman to compete". From there I just cracked on with a prep and 25-30kg later I was ready lol

My advice is just do it, Bodybuilding is not like boxing or indeed running where there can be serious health implications going into a competition in less than perfect condition. Nobody really nails it first time so just focus on getting lean, find someone to teach you to pose and enjoy it mate Smiley
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egg-custard
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« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2016, 04:04:06 PM »

thanks for the reply..I going to do some research and ponder


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ben-howard
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« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2016, 01:11:32 PM »

Conpeting gives direction for the training and always good to set goals and work on achieving them, once you compete once you'll always have that competitive streak in you

Exactly that a massive buzz!
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egg-custard
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« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2016, 04:33:40 PM »

hi thanks for the reply...I have been looking into competing now

I know I wont be ready for a good long while...but what can I do now to get the ball rolling,,?
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SuperSi
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« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2016, 05:29:27 PM »

Similar to the others. I was training pretty hard and wanted an outlet for it. A b/b competition seemed like a good challenge, so I went for it.

It can be difficult to tell if you're 'ready' as your physique looks completely different when body fat is right down.
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egg-custard
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« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2016, 10:51:13 PM »

I try to get to a lowish fat % but I end up not really getting there and end up being the same  as I did before ..

im pretty lean on my arms legs thighs they never accumulate fat

I just get pot bellied and fatty shoulders when bulking
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ben-howard
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« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2016, 09:05:14 AM »

To get the ball rolling I would start by setting small goals to create good habits , don't overwhelm yourself from the start

For example- a goal for the next 3 months is to ... track your macro's an find out what your intake is & set yourself 3-4 training sessions per week, without fail logging each workout

You'll learn a lot more in that 3 months than any amount of research you'll do

If our really into research and learning that way too, then take a look at
 http://muscleandstrengthpyramids.com

Research driven advice by a reliable source

Ben
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egg-custard
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« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2016, 11:55:57 AM »

I often think im doing to much...I train nearly every day in one form or another

I have home free weights which I do as well as going to the gym 4-5 days a week plus running often I always have a weright in my hand or doing calf raises  etc

if I have a rest day il run or do my x trainer

I think ive got into the mind set I need to push my self further and further..eg im up to ultra marathons from just wanting to run around the block

am I going into training overdrive..?

I do need to re asses
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ben-howard
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« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2016, 02:59:11 PM »

Depends what your looking to do mate, ultra-marathon training is pretty much the opposite of bodybuilding, (endurance training vs strength training) - so I would say set a goal (just 1) and gear your training/nutrition around that

Personally I would say for bodybuilding 3-4 days per week is the sweet spot, but depends on lifestyle etc and your recovery abilities , a lot of people train 5-6 per week just purely because they enjoy it

Find YOUR sweet spot that works best for you and your lifestyle, generally if your getting stronger over time, your recovering and then not doing too much
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egg-custard
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« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2016, 05:24:25 PM »

i think im doing to much..but I do enjoy what im doing...

I have been thinking once ive completed the London to brighton run in may I will stop running and concentrate on more bodyfitness/building
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SCOTTGALTON
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« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2016, 10:31:35 PM »

From what I have read from your journal, it seems like your doing  alot of reppy work, in the region of hundreds of reps. This won't be increasing your msucle size.

I'd give yourself a good six months to train and eat like a bodybuilder and see how you feel.

Something simple with preogressive overload in the 8-10 rep range and a good eating plan. Ben Howard of Ian Ducket are great people to look toward for simple, no bullshit plans,
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DDG
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« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2016, 12:31:50 PM »

Good questions, eggy  Cool

Speaking of no bulls**t plans, as a natural you're definitely going to need to get in the gym and hopefully avoid the 'bodybuilder' complex or fear of over-training or pushing too hard.

Contest preparation relies on high frequency work to sustain hypertrophy AND reduce body fat. Each body part should really be hit twice weekly, since it takes only a relatively short time for a muscle to recover from stimulation, no more than 3 days. This requires an approach that doesn't annihilate each time but stimulates an area sufficiently to produce adaptation while promoting adequate recovery (or not undermining it). During a contest phase it's inevitable that you will feel rough and, in the end, over-trained simply because getting in top shape means you will need to over-reach and push your body to a new place hitherto unexperienced.

For me, this does mean doing hundreds of reps since it's the only way to burn calories and force a deficit that's sufficient to make an impact in terms of fat metabolism. What this requires a careful structuring of calories and, in particular, carbohydrates around your workout to enhance recovery. To a degree genetics and metabolic type will influence how much and when.

To answer your questions: how did you get into competing and why?

I was already an athlete, a decent county-level sprinter and long-jumper as a teenager. I started weight training to improve my strength for these events. So, from the age of fourteen/fifteen my body was getting used to high volume work on the track and through various plyometric drills. I had strong legs (relative to my meagre body weight) from an early age and this created a good foundation. Training five-six days per week was par for the course. So, for the last thirty years this is what I've been doing - no bulls**t LOL

The transition from competing as an athlete to refining and extending my approach to weight training was fairly straightforward. Strangely though I don't think I ever trained with the view that I wanted to compete in order to set goals. My goal always throughout my twenties was to get bigger and stronger and develop my body evenly, not necessarily with competition in mind but more for aesthetic reasons: that I had an image of what I wanted to look like and so this served as a driver. For example, I didn't ever neglect any areas and everything was trained with the enthusiasm, emphasis and consistency, though it took a while longer perhaps for my upper-body to properly fill-out and match my legs which were always ahead from all the years of sprinting. Competition then was a challenge to see what I'd look like once I'd peeled away the fat. In my mind, I thought I had a decent physique underneath I just had to expose it. I also wanted to prove a point, I suppose both to myself and those around me at the time ... I think this fuelled my motivation. The first time I dieted properly was the worst experience I've encountered as I was completely exhausted by the time the show arrived. Knowing my body, being more consistent with my diet and years of experience have made the process more tolerable over the years and with arguably better results too visually.

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egg-custard
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« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2016, 03:45:27 PM »

wow..great post..thank you

I suppose im just a keep fit person..doing what I think is right..but not really gaining much now.. after my initial endevours


I like mixing things up...I have made some strength gains recently ..but feel I taking a step backwards in size

but im juggling to much I fear

the high rep thing is because I tend to max out a lot of the equiptment and the gym I now go to as it seems to be a get fit rather than a get strong type atmosphere/gym  and im falling in with this mentality
and I have a set of lightish weights at home

do I need to get a p/t  now
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DDG
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« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2016, 09:59:38 PM »

Regarding the need for a personal trainer, I wouldn't say so but everyone is different and many people often see some benefit in hiring a knowledgeable 'other'.

Why not? Well, if you're dieting for a show I think the onus and challenge is a personal one in terms of coming to know your own body. No one can tell you how things work for you or indeed properly gauge how and when to make important adjustments. For me, this is down to trial, error and some serious study of dietetics, how refinements of nutrition affect your own metabolism in relation to a particular training protocol. At the level of competition, I don't believe it's possible for anyone to come in properly peeled if they're not doing it themselves. You just have to live it, understand and learn what works for you as a individual, and moreover how to adapt over time as the body changes with age and lifestyle. For sure, it's not easy but the best counsel is surely your own which shouldn't preclude, where necessary, asking for advice but should rely more heavily on your own experience and 'know how'. I wouldn't ever hire a PT, either for training guidance or nutritional advice.
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